Reputational Due Diligence

Whether you’re a supplier or a customer, a senior executive or an investor, you need to know who you’re dealing with.

Security Watchdog reputational due diligence reports give you the confidence to trust the integrity and financial stability of your partners, clients, and acquisitions. To assist you in making well-informed decisions about current or prospective employees, we produce industry leading reports covering financial performance, linked associations, media exposure, known history and criminal prosecutions.

Reputational due diligence is a core function of any organisation's risk management policies.

Why choose us?

We have access to over 32,000 worldwide sources in up to 28 languages - including 450 continuously updated newswires and multiple governmental entities such as HM Treasury and the US Department of State.

Our detailed report includes information on sanctions, PEPs and directorships whilst providing a comprehensive view into the background and history of the subject.

Our report allows you to approach any negotiation, with the confidence of knowing that you are in possession of ALL the information required to make an informed business decision.

 

Do you know who you’re dealing with?

Some say we are the super hero crime fighters of the business world. See how the Advisory Bureau protected Lucy from the perils of partnering with the notorious Mr X…


Do you know who you’re dealing with?

Case Study

A client requested that Security Watchdog’s Advisory Bureau conduct reputational due diligence on the principal of a start-up venture they were looking to invest in.

During the course of the investigation it became clear that there was only limited information on the subject in the public domain. This unusual situation was misaligned with what we would expect to find on a subject with a career that had been spent in roles where we would have expected him to have acted as the public face of previous businesses, of which we would expect to find a record in open source media.

The sole reference outside of self-published career information related to a suggestion that a business in which he held a 50% stake had claimed to manage £50m of pension funds. When probed on this claim by the BBC the business was forced to admit this it had no such assets at all.

Further digging using specialist tools uncovered a news report dating back to the late 1990’s where an individual, who’s named matched the subject, had been convicted of embezzling £850,000 from a previous employer and sentenced to three years imprisonment. A known fraudster was named as an accomplice in the report, and by cross referencing Companies House records we were able to confirm the subject and fraudster were involved in a number of business ventures in the 18 months prior to the conviction report.

Although not possible to confirm, our belief is that the subject used the EU privacy laws, in particular surrounding the right to be forgotten, to have any reference to his conviction, that by the point of our investigation would have been spent under the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974, removed from the public domain.

Armed with this information our client was able to make an informed decision not to proceed with the investment.

 
The sole reference outside of self-published career information related to a suggestion that a business in which he held a 50% stake had claimed to manage £50m of pension funds. When probed on this claim by the BBC the business was forced to admit this it had no such assets at all.